Madison Madness

Another “unarmed black teen” has been shot and killed by a white police officer, this time in Madison, Wisconsin.

As usual, the “teen” Tony Robinson is actually 19, making him an adult. It turns out that the “teen” had a prior conviction for armed home invasion. What I find striking is that he was sentenced to mere probation for this reprehensible crime rather than actually serve jail time. How is this possible? How can anyone believe that probation is an appropriate sentence for someone who entered another person’s home for the purpose of robbing them and brought along a loaded firearm in order to kill or incapacitate the occupant in the event of resistance? It is absolutely unbelievable.

And yet, the “teen’s” white mother insists that he has “never been a violent person.” Well, thanks to Officer Matt Kenny, he’ll certainly never be a violent person again.

But the most disturbing thing about this situation is the pathetic, groveling, teary-eyed statement from Mayor Paul Soglin. He uses typical, politically-authorized language to describe the incident and his liberal sentiments. Of particular note is the misappropriation of the word “tragedy.” Indeed, it is tragic that even in a society which bends over backwards to afford opportunities to those of socioeconomic disadvantage there are still so many people who are simply incapable of acting in a civilized manner. But Mayor Soglin doesn’t mean that this is a tragedy in that sense; he means that Robinson’s death — independent of context — is tragic.

A tragedy is something bad that happens and is unavoidable in that it transcends mankind’s abilities to manipulate the material world to its will. Committing an act of violence, attacking a police officer, and getting shot is not unavoidable. These events do not transcend our ability to manipulate material reality. They are the decisions of a single person of moral and intellectual bankruptcy and the consequences of those decisions.

Madison Madness

The misapplication of charity

The Daily Mail has an article about the murder of Dr. Thomas Oakland by Stephen Underwood. I’m not sure that this can be attributed to white guilt, but it can be attributed certainly to the uncritical application of religious, especially Christian, teachings about charity and helping others.

Now, I am not a religious man. But I know for a fact that Jesus never intended for his followers to open their doors and welcome into their homes mindless, violent thugs like Stephen Underwood. Of all the means by which one may practice charity, Dr. Oakland chose to allow a thug into his personal life and transferred enormous sums of money to him directly. By allowing the thug to become familiar with his finances and the location of his cash, Dr. Oakland sowed his own death at the hands of his charity’s recipient.

White, do-gooder liberals and their Christian analogues ignore the real and present danger that surrounds them at their own peril. There are numerous ways to exercise charity and help those who do truly need, and can appreciate, a helping hand; establishing personal relationships and spending time one-on-one with violent thugs is the most dangerous and likely least rewarding among them.

The misapplication of charity

A monstrous injustice in New Jersey

A 72-year-old retired teacher has been arrested for felony possession of a handgun after informing officers that he had an unloaded (and not necessarily functioning) colonial-era flintlock pistol in his car during a routine traffic stop. He faces up to six years in prison, with over three of them to be served without parole due to NJ’s insane firearms laws.

This is the same sort of abject stupidity that was foisted upon Brian Aitken (whom Christie has not pardoned, by the way).

A morally vacuous populace begets a morally corrupt government, which further begets amoral enforcement apparatuses. The police who arrested him rather than sweep this under the proverbial rug are every bit as culpable for this idiocy as the legislators who signed the bill to create the law and their moronic constituents whose loyalty put these criminals into office. It’s a literal cycle of stupidity.

A monstrous injustice in New Jersey

Police brutality in Alabama

The Daily Mail has an article and video of officers from the Madison, AL police department throwing Sureshbhai Patel to the ground. The video is damning. Patel, who does not speak English, makes no attempt to get away from the officers. Just prior to him being thrown to the ground, the two police officers — who both appear to be much more powerful physically than Patel — are standing within inches of him. There is no struggle; for no apparent reason, Officer Eric Parker slams Patel to the ground in the middle of what appears to be a quiet suburban neighborhood. Patel is now paralyzed from the waist down.

This was in response to a call the police received about a “suspicious person” in the area, who turned out to be confused foreigner visiting his son and grandson.

Parker has been fired from the police department and faces an assault charge.

I think that what Officer Parker did in this situation is much worse than what Officer Pantaleo (the officer who put Eric Garner in a choke hold) did. Garner spoke English and understood that the officers were attempting to arrest him; Patel did not speak English and did not understand what was happening to him. Garner was engaged in criminal activity immediately prior to the altercation with officers; Patel was not engaged in any criminal activity. Garner was much larger than Officer Pantaleo; Patel is clearly of small stature and physically weaker than Officer Parker. And lastly, no one could reasonably foresee Pantaleo’s choke hold causing death; anyone could have reasonably foreseen Parker slamming a feeble old man to the ground causing serious injury.

Police brutality in Alabama